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Oak
Twenty Fifty
Dec 31, 2015 2:54 AM
This thread is for all of you to jot down what you have learned or what advice you can offer other collectors as a result or your collecting experiences. Here's my contribution from this year's observations:

2015 was a great year for Oakley collecting. An unprecedented amount of prototypes, trophies, factory one-offs and other assorted rare oddities came to market. I was able to help some of you verify and acquire some of this cool stuff. Unfortunately it also happens that some of you bought replicated fake stuff from other sources and paid staggering premiums for it. There will be interesting challenges in the future as a result of increasing release of non-released rarities.

The problem about all these internal non-released stuff is that it can be replicated. Very few of these items are made with proprietary technologies that a collector cannot get a hold of if you know the right people (this comment of course excludes the creative design aspect of it, anyway). If a person has the will and is willing to invest in it, anything can be copied. In fact, I can get a 3D print of any pair and claim it's a prototype. I can also replicate a trophy based on one of the ones I have and say it's authentic. There would be few people who can prove this is the case or not.

With that said, how can you tell if a rarity is the real deal or a copy if you come across one? The truth is you really don't know unless you have proper provenance. And sometimes the proper provenance is getting written proof from the person that made it. Easier said than done, but that may be the only choice.

Unlike many other hobbies, the Oakley hobby doesn't have an official body that certifies an item as authentic or not. Most of the time you just go on another collector's word that he/she got it for a legit source. However, I highly recommend against simply trusting another collector's word as definitive proof (even a major collector with an extensive collection of rare stuff). Unfortunately, major high end collectors are actually the source of a lot of these fakes. After all, it is not the casual fakers that have replicated the shadow heads, Rx/spike Bob heads, trophies, bike badges, static skull stickers, display items, etc.

In essence, my advice is not to take another collector's word at full value and do your own homework instead before buying. Now I'm not necessarily saying that another collector is intentionally trying to directly deceive you; what I am saying is that a collector could have bought an item based on false information and in turn is trying to sell you that exact item based on the false information later on. This is further replicated down the line as the item is sold over and over again. Whether deliberate or unintentional, the result ends with you buying a fake.

So again, don't trust just another collector's word on the authenticity of an item. Complete your due diligence, trust your instincts, get proper provenance, and you'll be all the more happy with the item knowing that you have taken the steps to verify its authenticity.

Happy collecting in 2016!
Benjamin
Ben Cahoon
Dec 31, 2015 3:57 AM
Thanks Oak!
pastor.elfstrom
Michael Elfstrom
Dec 31, 2015 7:57 AM
Thanks Oak!
flyer
Dave Arnott
Dec 31, 2015 1:02 PM
Being a Collector sounds like difficult work; the tough end of the hobby.
I'm just a User.
I buy to wear, and have no illusions or reservations about collectability.
Here's a tip of the Static Beret to you Collectors.
May your chosen manifestation of OCD become less complex in 2016.
Fuel36uk
Mark Price
Dec 31, 2015 1:29 PM
Thanks oak , wise words . Happy new year to all !!
mtedenajimenez
Adrian Jimenez
Jan 3, 2016 3:59 AM
So true Oak, which is sad. Usually when you make a big purchase in a hobby you're pretty happy about it, but I've always had to sweat a bit much when making big transactions in this hobby (unless you truly know the person you make transactions with). Feels great when everything goes as planned though. Just another reason to have patience and not rush into anything.
Oak
Twenty Fifty
Jan 4, 2016 1:35 PM
Just another reason to have patience and not rush into anything. - mtedenajimenez


Superb advice!
Dann
Dann Thombs
Jan 4, 2016 2:58 PM
The two trophies I have are recasts, but since I didn't pay anything for them, I don't care as much. Since I imagine the production would be similar to the original, there's not much to go on aside from maybe matching the paint jobs. But I classify these as shelf fodder so I don't put as much stock in them, and wouldn't pay all that much even for a genuine one. Too much out there, and I wouldn't buy a trophy for something I didn't win.

Tips for retail collection though; the main one is always patience. Everything will come around eventually, but you have to be willing to sit out years at a time. If you've been collecting for a while then typically there are other things to fill the time while you wait. Asking prices have gone up a lot in recent years, but you don't typically have to resort to the common BIN's you see on most listings. A quick glance at the completed auctions will show otherwise, it's just a matter of having the potential sellers break down and not want to keep relisting things over and over.

I'd also highly recommend not trying to become a collector. It should be organic. You buy to wear, and slowly find that certain things remain on the shelf, or others get less use and then you dip into buying for displays, or digging into the historical pairs. I don't quite understand how relative newcomers amass so much in such a short time, but the great majority slip away within an equally short amount of time. I think some of it is inspiration from other large collectors, but I'd feel hollow if things were added just to impress others. Not every pair I have has some profound origin story, but I don't have any where I can't remember where and why I bought them. However remember where I put some of them, is another story.
pricedollaz
Steven Price
Jan 4, 2016 3:21 PM
You can call my drinking/bar Money, Oakley money just one lasts longer than the other.
bomb oakley
CELSO LUIS
Jan 4, 2016 11:01 PM
Really a true collector is one who has patience and perseverance in the search for rare items.

It takes a long time and it is almost impossible to have all the items you want, but the important thing is to always have unique items, and above all be honest to publish on the site only true and items which we have in our collection.

I started my collection in 2005 and my first glasses from Oakley was a serial juliet j100026, and since then I turned passionate about oakley x-metal, have over 80 of them,in addition to other models and accessories, but I'm fanatic by oakley x metal.

I am a fan of Oakley since only regret not being able to access my country many other items, which are much easier w / my friends there of use.

But I'm happy to be part of this wonderful world of Oakley and even more so to have the opportunity to be part of this big family O-REVIEW.
And most importantly, we always have to be honest in our actions and the information, because only then we can make the site and the world oakley an increasingly reliable place p / future members who came to-do part of the family O-REVIEW.

THANK YOU.

OAKLEY MANY IN YOUR COLLECTIONS IN 2016 !!
Oak
Twenty Fifty
Jan 5, 2016 12:33 AM
Good advice!
skull.jacket
Steve Youngman
Jan 5, 2016 3:30 PM
My advice would be to have a plan and maintain focus. I am particularly guilty of this. I became a collector only recently and had a strange, self-imposed sense that I had "missed" something up to that point (which I guess is technically true), and found myself scrambling to "catch up". Exactly what I was catching up with is anyone's guess. I know what I like and what I want, but I also found myself with my hands full; not only that my eyes were bigger than my wallet but that I lacked comprehension on exactly what it was I was going for. I started out with one goal focused on one model but before I knew it, I had far too many items that spanned a wide range of styles - many of which I barely touch anymore.

I had to take a quick breather at a certain point and re-evaluate what I was doing. Excitement wasn't an issue; in fact, I was probably TOO excited and things were getting out of hand. After I calmed down a bit, I made my "hit list" and have been following it ever since (save for my recent fascination with the microbags but I digress). I think it was not enough to just know what I was looking for but also the range of which was available. Some frames simply did not come in certain colorways and others lacked the functionality I desired. Still others looked great but fit like a tourniquet on my big, fat head. Compromise isn't necessarily a bad word, but more like an acceptance that a plan is needed to sustain my hobby. I have done it before in other hobbies I have so why not this one too.

As was already said, patience is paramount. I became a hunter of sorts, lurking the various forums, ebay, and online retailers; not so much just to buy but rather to put together the reality of what was actually available versus practically achievable. I can wish every frame came in an electric blue all I want, but it just didn't make it so.

With any hobby, there is always one or more pieces that will grab your attention and make you act on want. The key is to control it; have a plan, have patience and have resolve. In a long enough timeline, you will achieve your goals even if it seems like you are missing out on something else. As it turns out, I really didn't "miss" anything anyway; all the pieces I thought I missed out on are still available in some form or another. So I have learned to sit back and wait, keeping a sharp eye out for just the right game. When I see the right one, I'll take my shot, and i'll get my trophy. The one well chosen proves a greater reward than the many taken in haste.
JP
John Schafhauser
Jan 5, 2016 3:55 PM
My advice would be to have a plan and maintain focus. I am particularly guilty of this. I became a collector only recently and had a strange, self-imposed sense that I had "missed" something up to that point (which I guess is technically true), and found myself scrambling to "catch up". Exactly what I was catching up with is anyone's guess. I know what I like and what I want, but I also found myself with my hands full; not only that my eyes were bigger than my wallet but that I lacked comprehension on exactly what it was I was going for. I started out with one goal focused on one model but before I knew it, I had far too many items that spanned a wide range of styles - many of which I barely touch anymore.

I had to take a quick breather at a certain point and re-evaluate what I was doing. Excitement wasn't an issue; in fact, I was probably TOO excited and things were getting out of hand. After I calmed down a bit, I made my "hit list" and have been following it ever since (save for my recent fascination with the microbags but I digress). I think it was not enough to just know what I was looking for but also the range of which was available. Some frames simply did not come in certain colorways and others lacked the functionality I desired. Still others looked great but fit like a tourniquet on my big, fat head. Compromise isn't necessarily a bad word, but more like an acceptance that a plan is needed to sustain my hobby. I have done it before in other hobbies I have so why not this one too.

As was already said, patience is paramount. I became a hunter of sorts, lurking the various forums, ebay, and online retailers; not so much just to buy but rather to put together the reality of what was actually available versus practically achievable. I can wish every frame came in an electric blue all I want, but it just didn't make it so.

With any hobby, there is always one or more pieces that will grab your attention and make you act on want. The key is to control it; have a plan, have patience and have resolve. In a long enough timeline, you will achieve your goals even if it seems like you are missing out on something else. As it turns out, I really didn't "miss" anything anyway; all the pieces I thought I missed out on are still available in some form or another. So I have learned to sit back and wait, keeping a sharp eye out for just the right game. When I see the right one, I'll take my shot, and i'll get my trophy. The one well chosen proves a greater reward than the many taken in haste. - skull.jacket

Great advice from everyone so far! This however sums it up for me:). Thanks Steve for an honest read!
Oak
Twenty Fifty
Jan 5, 2016 6:28 PM
Fantastic writeup! Keep it coming, everyone!
lord oakman
Jonathan Oakman
Jan 6, 2016 3:31 PM
When I started probably like may others I got my first pair and like the comfort, the fit, the colour and bought another pair then another I took a long break mainly because I was young and found beer and women but that another story lol. When I came back to it a lot had changed. I found myself buying things just because it had Oakley written on it I felt like I needed to play catch up and make my collection bigger allegedly size doesn't matter. upon reflection its quality not quantity. I too have made a list of what I want, some I should and will be able to pick up quite easily some ill have to wait a very long time weather that's because of how rare they are or because of cost. I tend to stick to certain frame types. I personally try leave frogskins alone as there are too many and they don't suit my face. Some people like x metals. Some like frogs, Some like radars chances are there will be someone collecting a certain style of glasses.

My only advice to new collectors is don't rush and think that you have to buy everything, unless you want to of course and like its been said before patience is the main thing to have. Everything will come up sooner or later.

Because some people have been hit by fakes or bad sellers it makes people a little apprehensive about buying off unknown collectors. Take you r time to get to know people post on forums or facebook groups try and build relationships there may be times when you need them.

I found that Postage is a killer weather that on ebay or buying though forums. it get expensive shipping from the states to the UK so always pay through paypal and never as a gift always pay the extra % for buying of goods at least then you are protected.

Hope this adds a little help.
Oak
Twenty Fifty
Jan 6, 2016 7:16 PM
I found myself buying things just because it had Oakley written on it I felt like I needed to play catch up and make my collection bigger allegedly size doesn't matter. upon reflection its quality not quantity. - lord oakman


Expertly said, especially the above.

Dann
Dann Thombs
Jan 6, 2016 7:32 PM
Another is beware of complete collections. Granted it's a huge thing when they're done but there's a few pit falls:

1) It may never be done s more are added
2) It may very well be done, but now you have to track down out of stock things
3) How do you count what constitutes the set

Completion can be all colorways of a model, or all colorways of a Signature series. I always go back to the person who completed the Supreme Frogskins, and then continued with the monthly Collectors Frogs that they did right at the beginning. He sold off everything and about the time we saw the Valentine's Day Frogs, he realized the true scope of how many would end up out there, and got out of the hobby altogether.

I did the same with the Artist. You get the itch sometimes when you get a few of the harder to obtain items, and the rest don't look to bad. I got the Murasaki and Kennseth Splice's so the rest weren't too bad. But I also got the Two Flores and C100 Gascan, so may as well get the rest of the Artist Series. They were released in a spaced amount of time, but then I also got the Soviet Gascan, and Chip Foose Gascan, all the while I really didn't like Gascans. So I cut my losses and just kept the ones I really liked. Plus they started releasing them at a faster rate and it was getting crazy and expensive to keep up the pace. In hind site since it did finally end, I could have completed them, but it doesn't bother me.

On the second point, you might be holding out to see if they truly end. It may not be too bad if you really like a model and already have a fair share, but I like to be cautious. Wait too long and you best hope for them to hit DE or the vault, else the secondary market will eat you alive.

The third isn't as tricky, since it can be subjective. I know we've discussed this several times before, but there's a few train of thoughts. You could a) stick to all the SKU's b) go for SKU's and special editions as some 3rd party authorized ones don't have them, or c) define your own that excludes Asian fit, or Signature series that are Rx, or however you see fit. In the end it's your collection, so I don't see the need for external approval, but it's a few things to consider. The main point is that it can be a huge boost to your collection, or the ultimate downfall. I know I was there around 2007 and just was disappointed with how I was using my money. It wasn't fun, and I was toying with just giving it all up.
Oak
Twenty Fifty
Jan 6, 2016 8:37 PM
Good advice. When collecting an entire line/model becomes a chore because there's too much, you know it's time to buy something else. It's rare I look towards completing a line simply because there's invariably a grey frame with grey lenses or polished black frame with grey lens for every model that I would drag my feet on getting. I wouldn't want to be a slave of purchasing for completion sake. "Buy what you like" should always be the #1 collector's tenet.
Dann
Dann Thombs
Jan 6, 2016 8:45 PM
There's some satisfaction when you get it though.


But there are other ways, like I have one of every Stretchline model of any given colorway. Or one of each original X-Metal. Or one of every model from 1975-2005, just sayin'
Oak
Twenty Fifty
Jan 12, 2016 5:24 AM
Another piece of advice from 2015 learnings: Don't sweat missing out on items. The cool thing about Oakley collecting is that if you miss out on something, there are literally thousands of other collectible items that are as cool (if not cooler) that will become available shortly - there is just an abundance of things to collect. Because of the amount of rare items that became available to the market this year, I had to skip many. True to form, those I missed out on were replaced with even cooler items that I was able to capitalize on due to timing.

So take it from me, there will always be something around the corner and it's not necessary to be bummed out by one thing.
qlr1
Jan 12, 2016 11:52 AM
Being a Collector sounds like difficult work; the tough end of the hobby.
I'm just a User.
I buy to wear, and have no illusions or reservations about collectability.
Here's a tip of the Static Beret to you Collectors.
May your chosen manifestation of OCD become less complex in 2016. - flyer

I agree, Flyer. I use the stuff that I buy, so collecting isn't something I set out to do. I call myself an accidental collector because I accumulated so many pairs. As one can imagine, I am not really after serialized items. No room and no funds for such trinkets.
Dann
Dann Thombs
Jan 12, 2016 2:17 PM
Accidental Collector is in my eyes, the best way to be a collector. The foundation is built on things you genuinely wanted. You're in control rather than following ideas that others have set about what you 'should' want.
GRFMotorsports
.Greg .F
Jan 12, 2016 3:21 PM
All sounds like pretty good advice, I dont have anything to add.
Oak
Twenty Fifty
Jan 12, 2016 3:59 PM
All the "Accidental Collector" comments are well-put. There is truth and clarity to collecting as a user rather than collecting just to collect. Sometimes you're too deep into the hobby to see the forest for the trees. And sometimes you get to hoarding rather than actually enjoying the product in the attempts to build your collection. I can honestly say I've been stuck in that mindset.
 
 
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