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1/552
Dullisc -
Badman
Frame: Dark Carbon
Lens: Ruby Iridium Polarized

X-metal lines continues. Yes not a popular saying but one that we are left with these days. These are extremely comfortable more so than the original X-metal Line. There are features that remind me of the Romeo's, Juliets etc.. such as the screws being featured at the top of the frame. And the lenses and profile remind me greatly of the X-Squared.

If you can get past the fact that they are not full metal, titanium frames and appreciate them for what they are, a mix of old and new with a blending of O-matter and metal then you will enjoy these glasses.
Comfortable, easy to wear stylish everyday glasses that will still get the attention from others on the street.

I will defiantly be looking to get more in the future.
Dullisc -
Pit Bull
Frame: Gunmetal FMJ
Lens: Fire Iridium

Extremly comfortable pair of glasses. Larger frame perfect for bigger heads. Great coverage with no light leakage from the sides.
If your a fan of the Monster Dog you will want to check these out. With the Unobtainium ear socks and nose piece they fit snugly to your head with no fear of them falling off.

My only complaint is not due to the frames themselves yet the FMJ finish which is a known issue. The FMJ tends to flake and peal off causing the chrome finish to show through. This is not something I'll knock off points for as this is not an issue with the frame just the coating.

Great glasses though worth a buy.
MicahS -
Mainlink
The Mainlink is a fantastic addition to the "link" line. Similar styling to the rest of the "link" line but the added height of the orbitals and variety of colorways makes this a much more user friendly and stylish alternative to the earlier releases of the same line.

This model continues with the unobtainium nose pads and ear socks to maintain a solid and secure fit, if a little on the narrow side.
flyer -
Thump
Matte Black 256mb.
Black iridium polarized.
52gr.

Late to the party (2017) but found a terrific deal on New Old Stock.
Very pleased.
Pro:
Iconic Oakley style, wonderful DSP sound, flip up lenses are worth having, sufficient battery/memory for 4+ hours of tunes, simple to add/delete songs (no proprietary junk software).
Con:
NO OEM lenses, not for love nor money. Aftermarket severely limited and questionable quality. No longer supported by Oakley, though oakleythumprepair.com is fast, honest, and reasonable. [B]Thump electronics are NOT compatible with wet, humid conditions: poor sweat resistance.[/B] No unobtainium, though in normal (non-exercise) conditions, they stay put sufficiently.
I also find a "Pro" in it's not Bluetooth compatible, as the ORockr is. I HATE answering my phone when I'm out and about...

BiGCoB -
Split Jacket Wind Gasket Accessory Upgrade Kit
My review will be on a very specific use of the Split Jacket Wind Gasket.
I thought I could use that for skydiving and ... I was wrong.
When you fall down at around 200 to 300 km/h face down, you don't really want to have the gasket detaching and poking your eye/eyelid. But that's what happened. This wasn't such a great experience at all.
So, maybe for other uses it's a good idea, but for skydiving, forget about it.
Wavecloud -
A Wire
I have the A Wire Thick with Light Blue lenses. Love the brushed finish on these and the lenses! I wish there were more low light options available on other frames.
etheman23 -
Employee Dog Tag
Nice to have
cacatman -
Carbon Prime
In terms of "wearability", they have a "feel" like a carbon blade, albeit slightly heavier. It's probably more like a carbon shift, but I've never owned a pair, so I don't know. Lens coverage is like a Badman, but frame feels "flatter" as opposed to excessively curved like the Badman.

I'm pretty sure the "shock" absorber is going to stuff up sooner than any of us would like. It looks good, but I doubt this mechanism will last the distance.

I think it's slack of Luxottica to reuse the tube and box thing for such an allegedly "unique" pair.

Having said that, I think overall, if you compare it to the slightly cheaper (at least when talking RRP) Ferrari Badman or Madman (and definitely the most numerous alleged "1,000" Rust Decay Bread boxes/Fuel Cells), I think it's likely the best piece of kit to come out of Luxottica in a long time.

You decide. I paid $819 AUD (USD$640) shipped.
Oak -
Metalworks Gold Carbon Fiber Money Clip
Oak -
Carbon Prime
Colourway: All black Ferrari Prototype and MotoGP

I love the Carbon Prime. Very light/supple and the shape fits my noggin perfectly. I am intrigued by the piston spring hinge (though I'm not sure about the long term durability of them) and am hopeful for even more complicated hinges in the future. The carbon injected O Matter has a great texture and aesthetic to it, and the real CF earstems adds a great feel to the model. I especially appreciate the ability to adjust the nosepieces.
Oak -
1 Eye-Con
I would have love to buy this!
pantojad -
Crush
I'm curious why other Oakley Crush has O logo on the number 6 but others doesn't have, is that normal? -mvp21

I believe the only ones with the o logo on the 6 are the skull ones and they did it because they did not want to impede or intrude on the skull logo. I have 3 of these now and hope to collect them all. this is personally one of my favorite original watches.
Jerry -
VUTT Sunglasses
VUTT Optical is a great place to get prescription and regular eyewear. They have a big selection, excellent customer service, and they are just all-around great folks. I just ordered progressive prescription sunglasses (Maui Jim) with the works on Monday and picked them up two days later.

This is the second time I have used VUTT’s services for eyewear. Two years ago, when I came in with my scrip from my ophthalmologist VUTT said that the script did not look correct. VUTT and I questioned the script but the ophthalmologist insisted that it was correct. VUTT questioned it more and finally an error was discovered by the ophthalmologist. Who doesn’t need an advocate like this? I would recommend them to anyone.
ROMEO -
1 Eye-Con
I am hanging for more colorways to arrive. I thought this would be the perfect day.
shihman -
Badman (Asian Fit)
Got the Badman (AF) X Ti as the regulars don't suit my high-cheekboned, flatter nose bridge, Asian face. :) I am impressed with the build quality. I was skeptical at first as it is not fully metal like the previous X Metals (Juliet, Romeo, etc). I am like the looks and have gotten a few praises. I am giving it a 4 star though as Oakley does not have the XTi (AF) in polarized. (There are actually more polarized options in regular models vs AFs, across the board, unfortunately.) . Wanted the Plasma or the Scuderia or the Dark Carbon but the optical shop I went to only had the XTi and at the time I got it, Luxxotica did not have any other Badman AF in stock.

As a last resort, I got third party lenses (Fuse+) so I can have polarized lenses as the glare was bothering me. I use them primarily for driving. They don't fit as snugly as Flaks but these are not Sport frames, so that is understandable. I like the flex/springs on the temples too.
skull.jacket -
Prizm Trail
My Prizm Trail arrived a few weeks ago but I only had a chance to take them out for a test today. Too much unseasonably nice weather was not ideal for what is supposed to be the 'intensity' equivalent of the Prizm line. But today was scattered, spotty, and eventually, total overcast. So on they went and I test drove with the new Prizm Trail.

As I went into this, I was to understand that Prizm Trail was in the same general intensity lens category as Persimmon or Yellow, as they were supposed to heighten or 'intensify' the perceived brightness of light. Under these inclimate conditions, Yellow and Persimmon tend to work reasonably well, with Persimmon being dark enough (at 60% VLT) to handle greater light changes. This ended up not being the case for Prizm Trail. From my perspective, the visual contrast was not necessarily intense, or at least as intense as I was expecting it to be.

The first thing one would notice about Prizm Trail is the lens base. It appears to come off as pink at first, much like what you would expect from a lens on the Land side of the Prizm spectrum. However, the Prizm Trail base isn't pink - it's orange. In fact, it is much closer in intensity to P42 Iridium than to Persimmon or Yellow. The contrast of the Blue Iridium on top of the Prizm Trail base is what gives the lens the perception of being pink when looking at it from the outside. At 36% VLT, Prizm Trail is darker than Persimmon, Yellow, or even P42.

As dark as the lens base is, the overall hue of the Blue Iridium is cast much lighter than if compared to OO RIP or G30 - both of which give off a solid Iridium reflection under darker lighting conditions. Prizm Trail, on the other hand, is light enough for the Blue Iridium to be somewhat washed away, even when put against a jet black background. The Blue Iridium is there, but it never quite shines through the way other light base lenses would have it. While this is not necessarily a hit against Prizm Trail, it is worth noting.

Once worn, it became obvious that Prizm Trail really isn't an 'intensity' lens as Oakley has defined the series in the past. Prizm Trail does have some very good attributes, but intensifying perceived light was not one of them. I used them for most of the day during high winds that brought lots of airborne dust, there were scattered clouds, and finally ending in thick cloud cover. So, the light went from hazy, to scattered, to dark. During all of this, Prizm Trail was most effective in the first two conditions, seemingly needing some light to function. When the overcast blocked all direct sunlight, Prizm Trail didn't heighten light perception; rather it made vision a bit murky. Even in scattered and hazy light, Prizm Trail still didn't brighten things up quite as much as Persimmon would have done.

Now here's what Prizm Trail can do - just like with the rest of Prizm, the lens gave much sharper contrasts to objects when moving. Whether in scattered, hazy, or overcast, Prizm Trail was consistent in providing a sharp definition of objects relative to their background. More so in motion than standing still, Prizm Trail took the fuzzy edge off when one object moved in front of another (relative to my POV) so I had more clarity of what was moving, making it easier (and faster) to focus on the object. So, basically Prizm Trail works much like a lighter version of Prizm Road, performing the same function but light enough to do so in environments that Road would simply be too dark for.

Prizm Trail is very effective in lower lighting conditions, or for indirect sunlight. When trees, hills rocks, clouds, or other obstruction blocks enough of the sun, Prizm Trail can come out and provide some great clarity for motion. But it does need some light in order to function; it's not an intensity lens and doesn't do a great job of intensifying light perception. But Prizm Trail is also pretty tricky - it looked pink until I put it on, it looked pretty dark until I took it out, and I thought it wasn't very effective until it was.

I don't think I will find myself in the environments Prizm Trail is meant for very often, so I don't know how much use I will get out of it. But that doesn't mean it's not worth a try. Cyclists, trail runners, & mountain bikers would probably find this lens more effective. The more trees in the sky and humidity in the air, the less direct sunlight you get and thus better conditions for Prizm Trail. I live in the Southwest so, it's either bright as s**t or it's not. So maybe Prizm Trail wasn't the best choice for me. But don't let me discourage anyone; try it out for yourself. It is good enough to keep at least one handy.

Overall: 3 - Recommended - Get One If You See One
ucdavisboy -
Kitchen Sink Pack
I will second other's opinions that this bag is on the bigger side- I wouldn't recommend it for anything below and average height/weight man (i.e. 5 foot 10 inches, 180 lbs. I don't have that issue- I'm 6 foot 5 inches tall and an athletic 235 lbs and the Kitchen Sink looks right at home on me.

It's also somewhat heavy because of all the metal hardware but- that's part of the charm. This isn't a lightweight hiking back, it's a Mad Science, Max Fearlight-ish, Purpose Beyond Reason, post-apocalyptic, looks like nothing else, urban warfare backpack. If the X-Metals are the edgy boundary pusher in the eyewear department, the Kitchen Sink is that in the backpack department.

Functionally, tons of room, expandable- the worlds only backpack pocket for eyewear that doesn't require you fold your earstems (great for me because I NEVER do), has a wet pocket that will hold even a pair of my Size 15 or 16 shoes- it's called the Kitchen Sink for a reason and lives up to it's name.

From a style perspective- always turns heads and I always get asked questions (mostly about those 3 hooks to the point I stuck carabiners on every single one so people would maybe "get" the idea).

At the end of the day, no other bag looks like this and it's truly and obviously something that came out of the 1997-2007 pre-Lux, Jim led Golden Era.

One of the few non-Oakley eyewear accessories I believe lives up to the standard the eyewear set. Expensive at $216 with tax, but recent sales have it dropped to $108 with tax- and at that price it's worth it. Grab one before Lux discontinues this legend too.
skull.jacket -
Persimmon
The persimmon lens is a quintessential Oakley product. It is meant for low light or inclimate weather and not for everyday use. Still, in the right conditions and environment the Persimmon lens is extremely handy to have. I went from accidentally acquiring one to having several copies - one for my M-Frame, one for each Split Jacket, and I received one more for my NRJV. I may have gone a bit overboard, but this is just how useful I find this otherwise odd and unassuming lens choice.

The persimmon is considered an "intensity" lens, meant to heighten or brighten the wearer's vision in less than ideal lighting conditions. In reality it doesn't actually increase brightness - actually it removes about 40% of variable light. Rather it tricks the mind into believing things are brighter (by perception) and a heightened state of visual awareness occurs. The Persimmon comes in at 60% VLT, making it somewhat darker than its Yellow counterpart (at 89%). Yet, the Persimmon outperforms Yellow because it has a greater range of performance. Yellow is much lighter so it doesn't take much added light to tap out. Persimmon on the other hand can handle increased brightness up to a certain point, therefore it can be worn longer and thus more reliable.

There is nothing visually striking about Persimmon - it is just a bright orange lens. The wearer's eyes are very visible, even if the lens fogs up. It doesn't add any real aesthetic to a frame unless the frame happens to be a Team Yellow or Atomic orange, so the look of Persimmon won't get anyone really excited. That doesn't really matter though, when the lens is applied. It is meant for low light conditions, inclimate weather conditions (like overcast or stormy, rainy weather), or can be used to enhance vision where tall trees or mountains block direct sunlight and cause lots of shadows. It's not "night vision" and doesn't make things glow in the dark, so don't expect that. Persimmon gives the appearance of brightening vison, so the wearer's eyes are fooled into believing vision is actually brighter. This lets the eyes spend energy focusing more on details rather than spending it fighting through greys and shadow.

The most ideal conditions for Persimmon is cycling, driving, running, or hiking. Any condition where one might be susceptible to overcast, stormy weather or loss of direct sunlight. Don't bother wearing this lens in the sun, though - since it arguable is the opposite of a sun lens like Black Iridium any direct sunlight will also be enhanced and might cause some actual "retina burn"! But it really depends on personal preference, personal or professional activity, or if the wearer even cares about enhanced vision in stormy weather (as opposed to simply removing the eyewear for the time being). While deployed to Iraq & Afghanistan, lenses like Persimmon were mainstays on patrol. A perfect "transition" lens to deal with the near constant sandstorms, extremely muggy rain, and to help with the transition into sunset. Naturally, leaders didn't really like seeing troops with orange and yellow tinted lenses, as they are not APEL approved because they are not "True Color" lenses. But it was hard to make them disappear, at least while in country, due to the obvious benefits of such a lens.

Of course Persimmon isn't for everyone; actually it's pretty niche. It really only performs well in certain conditions, but provides an outstanding performance in those conditions should they become present. I wouldn't recommend getting several sets as I have, especially if you don't think you would find something like this useful. But it would be beneficial to have at least one on stand-by just to give it a test drive. Persimmon is also one if the lowest priced Oakley accessory lenses so, if you find you don't like it, then you aren't out very much. Or maybe you like it so much that you add a persimmon all your sunglasses; who knows ... O-bsession is a funny thing.

Overall: 3 - Recommended - Get One If You See One
skull.jacket -
Prizm Road
I finally had an opportunity to jump on the Prizm bandwagon with the Prizm Road. This set was for the New Racing Jacket and I had the chance to try them out today. While I was excited to take them out, I didn't have high expectations. I have become sort of a snob in that I gravitate towards polarized lenses almost exclusively. Not that I can't appreciate a non-polarized lens; only that I get quite a bit of glare in my environment so non-polarized tend to give me a headache after a while. That said, the Prizm Road surprized me in how comfortable they were. They did a great job providing contrast without being too dark. While polarization would have been nice, there are other attractive features that make Prizm Road worthwhile nonetheless.

The first feature to be noticed is the familiar +Red Iridium. The hue is mostly purple at the center, turning red, orange and yellow towards the edges. Prizm Road is noticeably different from the standard +Red (grey base) which has a very stark red-on-blue effect in its +Red. Instead of a sharp contrast, the Prizm Road base give the +Red Iridium coating a brigher and warmer transiton between spectrum colors. The Iridium effect is close to the OO RIP and both are very similar when laid side-by-side. Only a mild amount of red, orange, and yellow reflection ultimately come through, but the colors still shine brilliantly enough even to offset the darker hues in the center. That alone is worth giving Prizm Road a try.

The Prizm Road base, however, is what really got me exited for this lens in the first place. I love trying out a new Oakley lens; I think this is truly what makes Oakley sunglasses different and special. The Prizm Road base comes off like a light magenta, a pink with a light purple accent. It isn't very dark - at least not as dark as the Oakley images on the website make it seem. This gives the lens a wider range of light conditions to operate in and making it more suitable for longer use. The pink hue reminds me of the G30 and G40 where it is somewhat noticeable at first, but then seems to all but disappear as time goes on and I would almost forget I even have a lens in after a while.

The Prizm Road is of course meant for cycling or running. I am not a cycler and I haven't taken them for a run yet. I did, however, use them for the one thing I do a lot - driving! I know ... not a driving lens, but whatever - strap in! The lens provided a good amount of contrast when worn, comparable to Warm Grey & G30. Perception & clarity were enhanced and I could more easily separate objects form one another as I moved along. This was not achieved with a color "boost" as with VR28 so color-wise, objects like foliage, signs, etc, aesthetically remained pretty much the same. Instead, the contrast was achieved by the sharp detail of objects as they moved relative to their background (or as I moved relative to them). As the sun began to set, the contrast properties relaxed and some intensity attributes took over. It wasn't very strong as if I switched to a Persimmon or Yellow lens, but it was at least a demonstration of its versatility in lower lighting conditions. The only real downside was the dashboard glare pretty much the whole way. It's hard to complain since I knew that was going to happen so, it was easy to ignore for now and enjoy the trip. I am sure this will eventually get old, but not before I get my fill of something new.

I can only imagine how crisp things will be in a future polarized variant of this lens. For now, I will just have to ponder how satisfying Prizm Road turned out to be. For a snob like me, it was pretty impressive. I hope the rest of Prizm turns out to be this nice. Prizm Road is marketed as a niche lens which is technically true. I do think, however, that Prizm Road has enough versatility that it can be used in a wider variety of situations. I took mine driving and did just fine. I am sure that when I get this out on foot, it will do even better. Take a minute to check this out in person before you buy as this probably won't be for everyone. But I also think if you do pick one up that you will be very happy with it.

Overall: 4 - Highly Recommended - Get One at First Opportunity!
50 Shades of O -
Deviation
Frame: Polished Black
Lens: Dark Grey

Personally, I wasn't happy with them and ended up selling them. To me, they looked and felt cheap. I consider these to be sub-par for a modern pair of Oakleys. I'd recommend the new Crosshair over these any day.
 
 
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